Posted by: landonrordam | July 31, 2009

Family ties

So! I know, it’s been a while, but there was an orange juice incident and the computer had to go away for a while.  But it’s back, and hopefully I’ll get (mostly) caught up tonight.

The next day (by this point I have no idea what day it is) we all went to discover famous Rørdams in Denmark.  What’s especially interesting to me is that a couple of the Danish Rørdams actually knew Søren Kierkegaard!  So it was exciting to find these people after I had read about them.

First, we went to Roskilde cathedral, where a lot of the kings and queens of Denmark are buried (there are a lot of them — Denmark has the oldest monarchy in the world). It’s a very beautiful cathedral, and really impressive.

The tomb of some Danish king... a Frederik, I think.  It was amusing how some tombs were huge and fantastic like this one, and some (Christian X, for example) were actually quite modest.  Probably says something about the kings buried in them.

The tomb of some Danish king... a Frederik, I think. It was amusing how some tombs were huge and fantastic like this one, and some (Christian X, for example) were actually quite modest. Probably says something about the kings buried in them.

What’s also interesting is that in Roskilde, paintings of all of the bishops of the Danish People’s Church (there’s only one at a time) are hung up.  So I got to see portraits of Jakob Mynster and Hans Martensen, whom Kierkegaard harshly criticized at the end of his life, as well as Thomas Skat Rørdam, who was a bishop at the turn of the century!  Exciting!

 After Roskilde, we went to Lyngby, where a few Rørdams are buried and where Peter Rørdam, an acquaintace of Kierkegaard’s, was a bishop.  I know you’re itching to see pictures of my distant relatives, so here he is:

Peter Rørdam, who knew Kierkegaard!  Isn't he dashing?

Peter Rørdam, who knew Kierkegaard! Isn't he dashing?

After Lyngby, we went to Christian’s mother’s house for a nice long Danish… er, dunce.  It ran from like 2-6, so I’m not sure what to call it.  But the food was fantastic — cheese, bread, seafood, meat, potatoes… very very good.  And Danes, in case I haven’t mentioned before, are very respectable drinkers.  So there was also a lot of good wine.

Then, after hanging out for a good long while, we decided to hit up some Danish pubs.  The first one we tried (a very old one that we think was around in Søren Kierkegaard’s time) was Det Rene Glas, or the clean glass.  This place was the definition of a hole in the wall.  It had two tiny rooms, and was full of people who looked like they’d been there since oh, 9 in the morning.  Lucky for us, it was also karaoke night!  So a lot of old drunken Danes sang to us until we finished our beers and decided to check out another place.

The next place we found was much calmer.  We found a nice back room and hung out.  We even took a picture!

From the left: my cousin Vibe, my mother, my father, me, and my cousin Ida.

From the left: my cousin Vibe, my mother, my father, me, and my cousin Ida.

Then, it was bed for us.  Until next time (which will be in about 30 minutes or so)…

I’ll leave you with one more interesting tidbit.

All the Danish kings and queens have their own cipher -- just like the college of William and Mary! So you can tell who built a royal building because the cipher is placed above the entranceway.  It's especially easy in Denmark because pretty much every king since the 1500s has either been a Christian or a Frederik.  This cipher belongs to (you guessed it) Christian the Ninth.

All the Danish kings and queens have their own cipher -- just like the college of William and Mary! So you can tell who built a royal building because the cipher is placed above the entranceway. It's especially easy in Denmark because pretty much every king since the 1500s has either been a Christian or a Frederik. This cipher belongs to (you guessed it) Christian the Ninth.

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